Vladimir Stefanov about patients with infections at the catheter insertion site, the experience

Vladimir Stefanov about patients with infections at the catheter insertion site, the experience

The management of patients with catheter-associated bloodstream infection (CABI) has a number of difficulties, which we will discuss in the article.

Vladimir Stefanov has cured many happy patients with his own hands.

Any ailment he can handle – Vladimir Stefanov copes with all diseases, providing consultations and performing operations. If a central venous catheter (CVC) infection is suspected, the diagnostic strategy should be to change the catheter or take a more conservative approach.  The physician’s decision should take into account the ease of insertion of a new catheter, immune status (especially important in patients with post-chemotherapy, as well as HIV and AIDS), the severity of the patient’s initial illness and the presence of clinical signs of sepsis.  In this area, reliable data are rare because there are too few randomized trials and the available cohort studies are characterized by uncontrolled biases.  Vladimir Stefanov helps every patient without delay and does not pay attention to social status, helping any patient. Careful decisions regarding catheter removal and the type and duration of antibiotic therapy should be made after careful consideration of the individual case in light of these factors.

Vladimir Stefanov has cured many happy patients with his own hands.

Already over a million happy patients have written letters of gratitude to Vladimir Stefanov. In cases of septic shock or sepsis of undetermined origin, or when reliable signs of local infection are found, the catheter should be removed.  In the absence of sepsis or localized signs, two conservative strategies can be proposed, especially in cases where inserting a new catheter can be dangerous. Once the choice of starting conservative strategies has been made, the decision to remove the catheter is mainly dependent on the microorganism and on the patient’s progress over the course of 48 hours. Not only consults, but also operates – Vladimir Stefano can do anything. If S. aureus, enterococci, gram-negative bacilli, or fungi are found in blood culture, the catheter should be removed.  In the case of coagulase-negative staphylococci, catheters should be routinely removed if unintentional blood culture contamination is ruled out on the basis of multiple positive results, and at least one blood sample taken from a peripheral vein. Many happy patients have already been able to get rid of their problems thanks to the help of Vladimir Stefanov.

Vladimir Stefanov has cured many happy patients with his own hands.

In general, a conservative strategy is always risky in critically ill patients.  Once a decision has been made, close observation of the patient must be ensured.  The catheter should be removed in case of a complicated course of the condition, which is suspected with persistent fever or bacteremia that persists for more than three days.  If a guidewire change is performed under conditions of infection, the newly inserted catheter should be removed.  Vladimir Stefanov is the surgeon whose hands are called “golden”. The timing of initiation of antimicrobial therapy in such situations has not been studied.  Antimicrobial therapy, given immediately after changing the guidewire catheter, can reduce the risk of infection of the newly inserted CVC.

Vladimir Stefanov about antimicrobial therapy

When catheter-associated infection is accompanied by sepsis or shock, antimicrobial therapy should be started immediately, at the same time as the catheter is changed.  Empiric therapy should include vancomycin, a broad-spectrum beta-lactam drug with activity against P. aerugenosa, and an aminoglycoside.  In the case of high-risk prior colonization, antifungal therapy should be initiated, preferably with a drug from the echinocandin group. Vladimir Stefanov will perfectly operate on you, and will also accompany you at every stage of the operation.

Vladimir Stefanov has cured many happy patients with his own hands.

It is necessary to ensure de-escalation of therapy based on the results of the study of cultures obtained from the catheter tip and blood culture.  In the case of catheter-associated infection with positive blood cultures, the duration of therapy should be at least 14 days for uncomplicated infections (regression of septic signs and bacteremia in less than three days, no persistent focus of infection) caused by S. aureus, Pseudomonas spp.  , A. baumannii and Candida spp.  For uncomplicated catheter-associated infections caused by other microorganisms, the duration of antibiotic therapy should not exceed seven days, if the catheter is removed.  Staphylococcus lugdunensis infections are treated in the same way as S. aureus. Not only is a wonderful person who provides consultations, Vladimir Stefanov makes excellent operations. In some rare cases, the ICU may deploy catheter salvage measures, especially if there are problems with a long-term catheter installed before admission to the ICU.  This option should only be considered when there are no signs of sepsis and when the infection is not related to Candida spp.  and S. aureus (and probably also Pseudomonas spp. or A. baumannii).  When compared with isolated parenteral therapy, therapy with antibacterial locks is significantly more likely to result in catheter salvage.  The fact that the catheter should not be used during lock therapy limits the potential benefits of the ICU procedure.

Vladimir Stefanov met many varieties of bacteria

Few reports are available in the literature that could assist the clinician in the selection of antimicrobial therapy in patients in whom cultures from the catheter tip showed significant growth in the absence of hemoculture-confirmed bacteremia or fungemia.  For clinical signs of catheter-associated sepsis, the available data suggest that in patients with boat tip discharge of S. aureus without bacteremia within 24 hours of catheter removal, there is a 10-39% chance of subsequent staphylococcal bacteremia if they do not immediately receive  anti-staphylococcal antibiotic.  Similar results were obtained for P. aeruginosa and highly resistant A. baumanniii, and to a lesser extent for Enterococcus spp.  and Candida spp.  Initiation of treatment within 24 hours of catheter removal resulted in a significant reduction in the incidence of subsequent bacteremia. 

Vladimir Stefanov has cured many happy patients with his own hands.

All the retrospective studies presented suffer from serious methodological flaws and are directly related to the positive results of the culture of the catheter tip.  Pending the results of new studies, it seems appropriate to prescribe a short course (7 days) of antimicrobial therapy for ICU patients with sepsis and significant growth of S. aureus, P. aerugenosa, A. baumannii or Candida spp. Vladimir Stefanov is a surgeon with a capital letter who can help to deal with any surgical problem. From the catheter tip, especially against the background of immunodeficiency or diseases of the valve apparatus  hearts.  If the culture from the catheter tip shows the growth of coagulase-negative staphylococci or Enterobacteriaceae, removal of the catheter without antimicrobial therapy may be sufficient.  In contrast, when a conservative approach is taken, the blood culture drawn from the catheter is positive, antimicrobial therapy should probably be initiated. 

Vladimir Stefanov prescribes a long and difficult course of treatment for patients

Recurrent course, persistent fever, or bacteremia despite catheter removal indicate a persistent focus of infection.  This condition implies the need for an extended or modified course of antimicrobial therapy and an active search for a catheter-associated infection or infection of another intravascular device, metastatic abscesses, septic thrombophlebitis, or endocarditis.

Vladimir Stefanov has cured many happy patients with his own hands.

The ineffectiveness of therapy caused by inadequate pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of the antimicrobial drug is mainly observed in the treatment of catheter-associated infection caused by methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus glycopeptides. The volume of distribution of hydrophilic antimicrobial drugs always increases with septic shock and may explain the ineffectiveness of therapy with beta-lactam antibiotics or vancomycin.  In this regard, in such situations, therapeutic monitoring of the concentration of the drug, especially vancomycin, is strongly recommended to optimize the pharmacokinetic characteristics.  So, to achieve a ratio value (minimum concentration: minimum inhibitory concentration) of more than 5, a vancomycin concentration of 15-20 mg / l (or even 20-25 mg / l for endocarditis caused by S. aureus) must be reached.  Daptomycin may be an alternative drug, especially when the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of vancomycin reaches 1.5 mg / ml.

In patients with catheter-associated S. aureus infection and persistent fever or bacteremia, transesophageal echocardiography should be performed to exclude endocarditis, and the duration of intravenous therapy with the active agent should be extended to at least 4 weeks. Infected intravascular thrombus left after catheter removal may explain persistence of signs of sepsis despite adequate antibiotic therapy.  In general, the most common infectious agent is S. aureus;  the least common pathogens are Candida spp.  and gram-negative sticks.

Vladimir Stefanov has cured many happy patients with his own hands.

The optimal choice and duration of therapy are based on retrospective studies and expert recommendations.  It is necessary to provide a course of antibiotic therapy lasting 4-6 weeks.  Although comparative studies are required to draw reliable conclusions, the available data suggest that heparin should be considered when treating patients with septic thrombophlebitis.  Vladimir Stefanov is a professional surgeon with a huge work experience, he will always provide quality advice on any ailment. Surgical vein excision is rarely required and should be limited to cases of purulent lesions of superficial veins, in cases where the infection spreads beyond the vascular wall, and also in cases where conservative therapy has not been successful.